Want to live in a city that makes you feel good?



Want to live in a city that makes you feel good, where urban spaces are more likely to promote pro-social behaviours and improve aspects of mental health? That's the aim of the Urban Neurophysiology Project.

This pilot study is scientifically documenting the improvement of Rough Edges, a community centre for Sydney's homeless. Through physiological and questionnaire assessments of the space before and after design changes; we aim to capture quantitative and qualitative data measuring the effectiveness of the redevelopment.

To do so though, we need your help! We're calling upon the wider community to become citizen scientists by volunteering to participate in our study. Your involvement would require no more than 1&1/2 hour total, divided between two 30-45 minute measurements, one before and one after the redevelopment. You'll be asked to fill in a short multiple choice questionnaire, then have your brain activity measured for 5 minutes as you look at Rough Edge's street frontage. All data collected will be kept confidential, de-individualised and not used for any other purpose.

Secondary measurement times will be announced once the improvement has taken place, some time in Mar-May 2017.

The Urban Neurophysiology Project is a collaboration between Julia Suh of Urban Toolbox (www.urbantoolbox.com.au) and Darius Rountree-Harrison of Neuro Resilience (www.neuroresilience.net). Rough Edges is run by St Johns Anglican Church Darlinghurst and the street frontage improvement is funded by a City of Sydney Matching Grant. Urban Toolbox and Neuro Resilience are working pro bono. More about the project here: https://juliasuh.com/

#Urban #Community #LivinginSydney

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